Utah National Parks

The mighty 5 national parks are the jewels of Utah's scenic vistas and geological features. These parks feature some of the most astonishing landscapes in the National Park system.

Arches National Park

Arches National Park

You will never forget the first time you witness Utah`s Delicate Arch. Two trails and a viewpoint accessible by car offer different view of Delicate Arch, Arches National Park`s most famous geologic feature. The park has 2,000 more arches, as well as towering spires, harrowing hoodoos and precarious pinnacles, including Balanced Rock, Skyline Arch, and Courthouse Towers. This park covers 73,000 acres, with a paved 40 mile scenic drive from the park entrance to the campground at Devil`s Garden with numerous parking areas for trail access and scenic overlooks. Road guides and hiking brochures are available at the visitor center and park entrance located 5 miles north of Moab via U.S. Route 191.

Arches is open year round, as is the campground. Be sure to carry plenty of water when exploring this vast park, no matter the season.
Location: Moab, UT
Phone: (435) 719-2299
Zion National Park

Zion National Park

The soaring towers and massive monoliths of Zion National Park offer spectacular grandeur. Designated in 1909, Zion is Utah`s oldest national park and with nearly 3 million visitors per year, it is also Utah`s most popular park. A multipassenger shuttle system is the only motorized transportation allowed in the main canyon during peak season. The shuttles let visitors sit back and enjoy Zion`s lofty formations such as The Great White Throne, Angels Landing, and Weeping Rock. It also includes a "town loop" that stops in the town of Springdale at the park`s south entrance. Visitor`s can still use private vehicles to tour a portion of the park on Utah Highway 9 though a mountain tunnel. There are several easy, self-guided trails in Zion, including Gateway to the Narrows, which is suitable for strollers and wheelchairs with assistance. More adventurous or strenuous hikes are also found in the park. Zion has two park entrances, both on Utah Route 9. One is 33 miles east of Interstate 15 and the other is 12 miles west of U.S. 89. The northern Kolob Canyons section is accessible off I-15, 18 miles south of Cedar City. Visitor center`s campgrounds and historic Zion Lodge are open year round. more information about Zion National Park 
Location: PO Box 1099 Springdale, UT 84767
Phone: (435) 772-3256
Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon

Bryce Canyon National Park is actually a series of natural amphitheaters sunk into pink cliffs and filled with delicate red rock "hoodoos". Millions of years of wind, water, and geologic mayhem have shaped and etched the surreal landscape. The most brilliant hues of the park come alive with the rising and setting of the sun, and the snow continues into the night with the canyon`s brilliant "dark skies" at night.

Located 24 miles southeast of the town of Panguitch, the park is open year round. During the winter months, the areas is popular with cross-country skiing and snowshoeing enthusiasts. Summertime offers myriad walking and hiking trails along the rim and toward the bottom of the canyon. Many visitors think it`s even better seen by horseback. The 37 mile scenic drive will also access key overlooks and vistas, such as Sunrise Point, Sunset Point, Rainbow Point, Yovimpa Point, and Inspiration Point.

The visitor center is open year round. Bryce Canyon Lodge, a National Historic Landmark, is open April-November.
Location: Bryce Canyon City, UT 84717
Phone: (435) 834-5322
Canyonlands

Canyonlands

View from thousands of feet down to the Green and Colorado Rivers, or thousands of feet up to red rock pinnacles, cliffs and spires create the incredible beauty of Utah`s largest national park. The rivers slice Canyonlands National Park into three districts, each named according to its distinctive landscape. Island in the Sky is the northern section, where visitors can look down to the Colorado River on the east and the Green River on the west. The southern tip overlooks the rivers` confluence. The Needles District is named for its profusion of red rock spires and sandstone fins. The remote Maze District is Canyonlands` most jumbled stone playground, requiring backcountry use permits year round. Major entrances to the park are accessible from U.S. Route 191. Access to Island in the Sky is 35 miles northwest of Moab. The Needles District is accessible 22 miles north of Monticello. Canyonlands is world-renowned for its four-wheel drive and mountain bike routes, as well as its whitewater rafting. The park`s visitor centers are open year round.
Location: 2282 SW Resource Blvd. Moab, UT 84532
Phone: (435) 719-2313 or (435) 259-4351 for backountry information
Capitol Reef

Capitol Reef

Capitol Reef National Park splashes color for 100 miles from its northern to southern boundaries. The central geologic feature, the Waterpocket Fold, is a bulging uplift of rainbow-hued sandstone "reefs" and canyons. Much of Capitol Reef is an inviting wilderness of sandstone formations such as Capitol Dome, Hickman Bridge and Temple of the Sun & Moon in the backcountry of splendid Cathedral Valley. Rock art petroglyphs are abundant in the midst of Capitol Reef`s red rocks and tell the story of the early indigenous people, the Fremont Culture. Nestled in teh valley near the park headquarters are the large orchards of Fruita, an early pioneer settlement where a variety of fruit may be picked in season. Cathedral Valley and other backcountry areas are reached by traveling on high-clearance dirt roads. The park is 11 miles east of Torrey or 37 miles west of Hanksville on Highway 24.
Location: HC-70, Box 15, Torrey, UT 84775
Phone: (435) 425-3791, ext 4111